J.C.'s Blog: March 2012 Entries - Wandtv.com, NewsCenter17, StormCenter17, Central Illinois News-

J.C.'s Blog: March 2012 Entries

Posted:

20120328

 

March= Warm and Dry…

The month of March has felt more like May with highs the last couple of weeks peaking in the 70's and 80's. If we rewind to the beginning we saw a high of 36 on the 3rd, 40 on the 49th, and 39 on the 5th and 2" of snow fell on the 4th bringing our season snow total to 5.5" which is way below normal. In previous blog posts I have a chart that shows how warm the month has been with records broken this year. We are on track for this to be the warmest March on record for the whole state. Here is a break down of the highs we have recorded.

 

30's 2 days

40's 2 days

50's 1 day

60's 8 days

70's 8 days

80's 7 days (we had one stretch of 3 days in a row of 80's from March 13th through the 15th and then a stretch of 4 days from March 18th to 21st).

Precipitation has been at a premium this month and for the first part of the year. Our weather site has only recorded .82" of liquid precipitation over the first 28 days of the month. By this time we average around 2.93". This puts us -2.11" below average for the first 28 days. The first three months have also been extremely dry with a total liquid recorded precipitation total at our weather site of 3.14". By this time we average around 7.11". This puts us -3.94" below average for the first 3 months. We have seen some timely rains in some locations but on a whole it's very dry. That is evident this planting season with dust being blown around everywhere. Here are a couple statewide maps from the Regional Climate Center that show how dry we have been.

 

The map below shows precipitation totals statewide. The heaviest has fallen across southern Illinois.

 

 

The map below show the departure from Mean across the state. Notice the area in McLean, Ford, Woodford, Tazwell, DeWitt this month is the area's with greatest departure.

 

 

Here is a map of precipitation across the state from January 1 to March 27th. Western Illinois is the area that is the driest. This area has on average picked up 2" to 3".

 

 

 

This shows the departure from the mean precipitation. Notice the driest area is in Woodford and McLean counties also in western Illinois. 

 

 

Here is the drought conditions across the US.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

20120325

 

A big surprise!

 

I have to give a huge shout out to my wife Ashley for this weekend! She surprised me with an early birthday party in Mattoon on Saturday night. I had no idea that she was even planning this event at all.

 

            I guess from what I have learned about the planning of this party, Ashley had started a couple months back. She was really excited and also nervous because as she says, "it's hard to keep anything from me." She contacted all my friends from college and a few from high school to come. The funny part is that I was just talking with one of my friends and told him we should hang out soon. That was on Friday night the day before the party and I could just hear him on the other side of facebook chat laughing. She with the help from a few people got me a cake that was in the shape of a golf hole complete with pretzel trees. There was even a flag on the green. Also, my brother in-laws girlfriend made a sign that said Happy Birthday JC with a golf ball and a putter with the hole in front of it. She is a really talented artist and I thought that sign was really neat.

 

            My Dad had said he wanted us all together because my Brother Josh's birthday this Monday. So when we were at his house last weekend he mentioned going to dinner on Saturday night. I said sure and just let us know where and when. So I called him late in the week to confirm that we were still going to do dinner and he said Custom Smokehouse in Mattoon which is close to our house. Come to find out he was using that to keep me in the dark and not think that the party was for me.

 

            Saturday morning rolls around and we are up doing something around the house and I am working in the yard. Ashley tells me she has to go to see her brother to get me a birthday present and she had mentioned that to me earlier in the week. So I told her I would be here working and she left for a while. She gets back and I told her we needed to get a card for Josh before we head to dinner. We both got ready and stopped got him a card and a couple lotto tickets because he turns 18! We arrived at the Smokehouse and I walked in and my Dad met us at the door. At this point I still have no idea what is happening and as I walked into the back room all I see is a huge group of my friends and family and then realized that it was my birthday party! I can't tell you in words how much it meant to me to see all these people there for me. I was so excited and felt really blessed to have a wife that is so wonderful. When I talked to Ashley she said she was almost more nervous planning this party and getting everyone in place then she was for our wedding.

 

Thanks to all my friends and family for a great night last night. You have made me feel very blessed. Friday will mark my 31st birthday and I just hope that my next 31 years are as great as the last. I know they will be amazing because I have a wife who is so wonderful and a family who are very supportive and always there when you need them.

 


 

 

 

 

 

20120321

 

More Records fall again today. Here is the updated chart from the National Weather Service out of Lincoln.

 

 

City Wednesday
March 14
Thursday
March 15
Friday
March 16
Saturday
March 17
Sunday
March 18
Monday
March 19

Tuesday
March 20

Wednesday
March 21
Charleston** 78 in 2007
(81)
78 in 1921+
(78)
80 in 1945
(77)
76 in 1940
(81)
76 in 1903
(80)
81 in 1907
(82)
82 in 1948
(83)
86 in 1907
Danville** 76 in 2007
(80)
78 in 1921
(81)
80 in 1945
(81)
76 in 1940
(79)
78 in 1918
(80)
80 in 1903
(81)
79 in 1921+
(83)
80 in 1918
Decatur 78 in 2007 
(78) 
78 in 1995 
(79)
84 in 1945 
(76)
82 in 1894 
(78)
78 in 1918
(78)
83 in 1921
(78)
83 in 1921
(80)
82 in 1997+
Effingham* 81 in 2007 
(79)
79 in 2007 
(82)
76 in 1995 
(77)
76 in 1995 
(76)
76 in 1989
(81)
75 in 1969
(80)
74 in 1972
(81)
79 in 1966
(83)
Galesburg* 74 in 1971 
(72)
73 in 1995 
(78)
78 in 1945 
(80)
76 in 1903 
(79)
76 in 1903
(79)
75 in 1976
(80)
74 in 1966
(79)
79 in 1938
(80)
Jacksonville* 81 in 1990 
(80)
79 in 1945+ 
(84)
86 in 1945 
(84)
81 in 1945 
(77)
78 in 1918
(80)
79 in 1921
(79)
84 in 1935
(80)
91 in 1907
(82)
Lincoln 77 in 1933 
(82)
78 in 1935 
(83)
82 in 1945 
(79)
76 in 1940 
(79)
80 in 1918
(81)
79 in 1921
(81)
83 in 1921
(83)
80 in 1918
(84)
Normal* 76 in 2007
(78)
76 in 2007+ 
(81)
80 in 1945 
(83)
82 in 1894 
(81)
79 in 1903
(82)
78 in 1921+
(82)
80 in 1921
(83)
88 in 1907
(84)
Olney* 80 in 2007 
(81)
78 in 1995+ 
(84)
84 in 1945 
(78)
76 in 1989+ 
(76)
76 in 1979+
(83)
82 in 1907
(82)
81 in 1948
(85)
86 in 1907
(85)
Peoria 76 in 1995 
(81) 
77 in 1935  
(81)
80 in 1945 
(78)
80 in 1894 
(78)
79 in 1903
(81)
79 in 1921
(81)
79 in 1921
(81)
87 in 1907
(82)
Springfield 75 in 2007+ 
(83)
79 in 1995+ 
(83)
82 in 1945 
(79)
79 in 1894 
(79)
77 in 1886
(80)
80 in 1907
(81)
81 in 1921
(82)
91 in 1907
(82)
Urbana 78 in 2007
(81)
76 in 1995
(81)
78 in 1945
(79)
79 in 1945
(81)
75 in 1918+
(80)
77 in 1921+
(81)
79 in 1921
(82)
85 in 1907

* Sites report at 6 AM or 7 AM.  
**Sites report at 6 PM.
Other sites report at midnight.

Record Warm Lows

 

City Wednesday
March 14
Thursday
March 15
Friday
March 16
Saturday
March 17
Sunday
March 18
Monday
March 19

Tuesday
March 20

Wednesday
March 21
Lincoln 56 in 1990 
(53)
54 in 1919 
(59)
57 in 1919 
(52)
57 in 1945 
(53)
50 in 2003
(53)
61 in 1921
(59)
63 in 1921
(58)
53 in 2011
Peoria 58 in 1990 
(54)
54 in 1919 
(58)
50 in 1936 
(56)
56 in 1894 
(58)
59 in 1903
(57)
61 in 1921
(63)
52 in 1894
(63)
57 in 1894
Springfield 59 in 1990 
(58)
58 in 1919 
(59)
55 in 1946 
(56)
54 in 1894 
(60)
60 in 1903
(58)
62 in 1921
(66)
57 in 1894
(65)
55 in 2011

Notes:  

  • Urbana's record high of 81 on March 14th was the earliest 80+ degree high temperature in a calendar year.
  • Springfield's record warm low of 66 on March 19th broke the all time March record warm low of 65 on March 30, 1989.

 


 

 

 

20120320

 

Welcome Spring!!!!

 

Spring arrived this morning at 12:14 am Central Daylight Time as the Vernal Equinox occurred. Once again the heat is on across the CI. The past week we have been enjoying weather that is usually reserved for central and south Florida this time of the year. Highs have peaked in the upper 70's and lower 80's and it looks like we are in for one more day of this before a cool pattern sets in. Its not going to be a cold pattern by any means just some cooler temps with highs sliding back into the upper 60's and lower 70's. That is still about 10 degrees above normal for this time of year.

 

Here is a chart of the record highs from the past week and what the records are for the next couple of days. You will also notice the recorded high for the day is listed in parentheses.

 

Record Highs   

 

City Wednesday
March 14
Thursday
March 15
Friday
March 16
Saturday
March 17
Sunday
March 18
Monday
March 19

Tuesday
March 20

Wednesday
March 21
Bloomington*

76 in 2007
(78)

76 in 2007+ 
(81)
80 in 1945 
(83)
82 in 1894 
(81)
79 in 1903
(82)
78 in 1921+
(82)
80 in 1921 88 in 1907
Champaign 78 in 2007 
(81)
76 in 1995 
(81)
78 in 1945
(79)
79 in 1945
(81)
75 in 1918+
(80)
77 in 1921+
(81)
79 in 1921 85 in 1907
Charleston** 78 in 2007
(81)
78 in 1921+
(78)
80 in 1945
(77)
76 in 1940
(81)
76 in 1903
(80)
81 in 1907
(82)
82 in 1948 86 in 1907
Decatur 78 in 2007 
(78) 
78 in 1995 
(79)
84 in 1945 
(76)
82 in 1894 
(78)
78 in 1918
(78)
83 in 1921
(78)
83 in 1921 82 in 1997+
Effingham* 81 in 2007 
(79)
79 in 2007 
(82)
76 in 1995 
(77)
76 in 1995 
(76)
76 in 1989
(81)
75 in 1969
(80)
74 in 1972 79 in 1966
Galesburg* 74 in 1971 
(72)
73 in 1995 
(78)
78 in 1945 
(80)
76 in 1903 
(79)
76 in 1903
(79)
75 in 1976
(80)
74 in 1966 79 in 1938
Jacksonville* 81 in 1990 
(80)
79 in 1945+ 
(84)
86 in 1945 
(84)
81 in 1945 
(77)
78 in 1918
(80)
79 in 1921
(79)
84 in 1935 91 in 1907
Lincoln 77 in 1933 
(82)
78 in 1935 
(83)
82 in 1945 
(79)
76 in 1940 
(79)
80 in 1918
(81)
79 in 1921
(81)
83 in 1921 80 in 1918
Olney* 80 in 2007 
(81)
78 in 1995+ 
(84)
84 in 1945 
(78)
76 in 1989+ 
(76)
76 in 1979+
(83)
82 in 1907
(82)
81 in 1948 86 in 1907
Peoria 76 in 1995 
(81) 
77 in 1935  
(81)
80 in 1945 
(78)
80 in 1894 
(78)
79 in 1903
(81)
79 in 1921
(81)
79 in 1921 87 in 1907
Springfield 75 in 2007+ 
(83)
79 in 1995+ 
(83)
82 in 1945 
(79)
79 in 1894 
(79)
77 in 1886
(80)
80 in 1907
(81)
81 in 1921 91 in 1907

* These sites report at 6 AM or 7 AM.  Other sites report at midnight.
**Site reports at 6 PM.

Record Warm Lows

 

City Wednesday
March 14
Thursday
March 15
Friday
March 16
Saturday
March 17
Sunday
March 18
Monday
March 19

Tuesday
March 20

Wednesday
March 21
Lincoln 56 in 1990 (53)                     54 in 1919 (59)                     57 in 1919 (52)                57 in 1945 (53)             50 in 2003
(53)             
61 in 1921
(59)              
63 in 1921               53 in 2011             
Peoria 58 in 1990 (54)          54 in 1919 (58) 50 in 1936 (56) 56 in 1894 (58) 60 in 1903
(57)
62 in 1921
(63)
57 in 1894 55 in 2011
Springfield 59 in 1990 (58) 58 in 1919 (59) 55 in 1946 (56) 54 in 1894 (60) 60 in 1903
(58)
62 in 1921
(66)
57 in 1894 55 in 2011


Notes:  Champaign's record high of 81 on March 14 was the earliest 80+ degee high temperature in a calendar year. 
              Springfield's record warm low of 66 on March 19 broke the all time March record warm low of 65 on March 30 1989.
more climate information available at www.crh.noaa.gov/ilx

 


 

 

 

20120315


NEW RECORDS AGAIN....

 

Springfield: 83 breaks old record of 79 (1995)

 

Lincoln: 83 breaks old record of 78 (1935)

 

 

 


 

 

20120314

 

Warm Day!!!

 

Two official records were broken today with more reports still coming in as of 6 pm.

 

NEW RECORDS

 

Lincoln: 81   old 77 (1933)


Springfield: 83   old 75 (2007)

 

TIE RECORD

 

Decatur 78 Tie 78 (2007)

 

Danville 80 Tie 80 (1945)

 

Here is a list of records over the next several days for several cities in the CI... Highs will threaten these through the weekend.

 

 

City Wednesday
March 14
Thursday
March 15
Friday
March 16
Saturday
March 17
Sunday
March 18
Monday
March 19
Bloomington 76 in 2007 76 in 1935, 2007 80 in 1945 82 in 1894 79 in 1903 78 in 1903, 1921
Champaign 78 in 2007 76 in 1995 78 in 1945 79 in 1945 75 in 1903, 1918 77 in 1907, 1921
Decatur 78 in 2007  78 in 1995 84 in 1945 82 in 1894 78 in 1918 83 in 1921
Effingham 81 in 2007 79 in 2007 76 in 1995 76 in 1995 76 in 1989 75 in 1969
Galesburg 74 in 1971 73 in 1995 78 in 1945 76 in 1903 76 in 1903 75 in 1976
Jacksonville 81 in 1990 79 in 1935, 1945 86 in 1945 81 in 1945 78 in 1918 79 in 1921
Lincoln 77 in 1933 78 in 1935 82 in 1945 76 in 1940 80 in 1918 79 in 1921
Olney 80 in 2007 78 in 1921, 1995 84 in 1945 76 in 1940, 1989 76 in 1910, 1921, 1979 82 in 1907
Peoria 76 in 1995  77 in 1935  80 in 1945 80 in 1894 79 in 1903 79 in 1921
Springfield 75 in 1971, 1975, 2007 79 in 1935, 1995 82 in 1945 79 in 1894 77 in 1886 80 in 1907

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

20120313

 

My wife Ashley has been writing a blog for a little while now and she is a really great writer! I wish I could write like she does. Anyway, we do some traveling and explore different things around the CI and at times to the beaches of the Caribbean. If you want to check out some of our adventures here is a link to her blog and it will always be at the top of my blog too. Take some time and check it out if you want.

 

http://passportthroughtheworld.blogspot.com/2012/03/restaurant-roundup.html?spref=tw

 

 


 

 

20120313

 

Wow!!! What a  day its been across the CI. Blue sky, light wind, and temperatures into the upper 70's this weather is going to spoil us. We can't let our guard down yet even though the forecast looks really nice over the next several days. We will have a chance for some scattered thunderstorms Thursday through Saturday but its still mid-March. The graphic below shows when out average date is for the final freeze. Yes we can still have freezing temps past this but this is when we expect it to come to an end.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

20120309

 

Time Change!!!!

 

A little reminder that before you go to bed on Saturday to turn your clock ahead one hour. We say goodbye to Standard time and hello to Daylight Saving Time. This is a great time to change your batteries in your smoke detectors, carbon monoxide and NOAA weather radios.

 

Have a great weekend!!!!!!


 

 

20120305

 

 

NOAA Weather Radio's…It could save your life!!!

 

I have to start by giving a big thank you to all of you who stopped by the Walgreen's store on the corner of US-36 and Il-121 in Decatur this evening. We sold over 130 radios and programmed many more. The radios will be for sale now through the end of May at all Walgreens stores through out central Illinois and Schnucks stores in Springfield and Champaign. The radios are 29.99 and are the best investment you can every make! We are starting to plan another programming season in the Effingham area and I will fill you in as time goes along on when and where that will take place.

My prayers are still going out to all the families of this past week's tornado outbreak across the Midwest and Deep South. This is just a reminder of why it's so important to be prepared for severe weather. I always tell the kids when I speak to classes to always remember these four words. Plan, Practice, Monitor and Act as these simple words could save your life someday! I also talk to them about the importance of having a NOAA weather radio. A prefect example is what took place in Harrisburg Illinois, a small town just 170 miles south of Decatur. The tornado touched down a little before 5 AM when most people are still sleeping and if you didn't have a weather radio you might not have known until it was too late. The warning sirens are only meant to be heard outdoors and not in your home so we cant simply rely on them. This is why I ask you to please take the time and grab one of these radios!

Tomorrow March 6th, there is a statewide tornado drill at 10 AM. If you have a weather radio this is a perfect time to test it as all the National Weather Service Offices across the state will issue a statewide tornado warning. If for some reason you weather radio doesn't go off please contact me or your local Emergency Managers office and see if you can get your radio looked at. Also, this is a good time to practice your plan for a tornado and remind the kids where they need to go in the event a tornado or severe weather might strike. This whole week is dedicated to severe weather preparedness and in the Midwest the weather can change at a moments notice.  

 

 

 

 


 

 

20120229

 

 

 

 

The tornado that struck Harrisburg this morning has been rated an EF 4 with winds of 170 mph and was 200 yards wide (two football fields wide). This in from the National Weather Service Office in Paducah Kentucky. 6 people are confirmed dead in the storm. This is why its so important to have a NOAA weather radio because this storm came through early in the morning.

 

My prayers go out to everyone in southern Illinois.

 

 


 

 

 

 

20120228

 

Good bye February!!!!

 

Usually tonight we would be saying goodbye to February but it's a leap year so we get to enjoy one more day of the month. Here is an article explaining why we have leap year.

 

Leap year: 2012 is a Leap Year

Leap Years 2008 – 2032

 

Year

February 29 – day of the week

2008

Friday

2012

Wednesday

2016

Monday

2020

Saturday

2024

Thursday

2028

Tuesday

2032

Sunday

Upcoming Leap Day: 29 February, 2012

A leap year consists of 366 days, as opposed to a common year, which has 365 days.

During Leap Years, we add a Leap Day, an extra – or intercalary – day on February 29. Nearly every 4 years is a Leap Year in our modern Gregorian Calendar.

When is the next Leap Day? Traditions and Superstitions on Leap Day
Leap Day Trivia World Events during the Leap Year 2012

Why do we need Leap Years?

Leap Years are needed to keep our calendar in alignment with the Earth's revolutions around the sun. It takes the Earth approximately 365.242199 days – or 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 46 seconds (a tropical year) – to circle once around the Sun.

 

 

Note: The illustration is not to scale.

However, the Gregorian calendar has only 365 days in a year, so if we didn't add a day on February 29 nearly every 4 years, we would lose almost six hours off our calendar every year. After only 100 years, our calendar would be off by approximately 24 days!

How do we calculate Leap Years?

In the Gregorian calendar 3 criteria must be met to be a leap year:

  • The year is evenly divisible by 4;
  • If the year can be evenly divided by 100, it is NOT a leap year, unless;
  • The year is also evenly divisible by 400. Then it is a leap year.

This means that 2000 and 2400 are leap years, while 1800, 1900210022002300 and 2500 are NOT leap years.

The year 2000 was somewhat special as it was the first instance when the third criterion was used in most parts of the world since the transition from the Julian to the Gregorian Calendar.

http://www.timeanddate.com/date/leapyear.html

 


 

 

 

 

20120216

 

As we all have noticed this winter has been warm and the snow has been very elusive. I found a really great article on why this is occurring written by the National Weather Service in Lincoln. These men and women do an amazing job so here is their article.

 

 http://www.crh.noaa.gov/news/display_cmsstory.php?wfo=ilx&storyid=79143&source=0

 

 

 Looking ahead in the forecast we will see mild air in place tomorrow and on Saturday. A weak system will drop through the lakes and bring a shot of some cooler air for Sunday when highs will fall back into the upper 30's. This shot of cold air will be short lived as a system will develop across the plain and pump warm air back into the CI. High will rebound into the mid-40's Monday and upper-40's on Tuesday.

 

 Rain chances increase with the system moving in on Tuesday. This is where models start to diverge with their thinking. GFS brings a wave across the area on Tuesday and then another one on its heals for Wednesday. The Euro model is less aggressive and brings a chance for rain with a wave on Tuesday and then never develops the second system. This is the first run that has played out this way so I am going to hold in the rain chances through Wednesday for now. Temps will remain in the upper-40's and lower 50's and it looks to be all rain!

 

 


 

 

20120210

 

 

 

With snow flying across the CI this afternoon I thought this would be fitting. Here are all the different types of frozen precipitation. The type of snowflake falling from the sky has all to do with temperature and moisture in the atmosphere. Here is a link to a great article breaking this down for you.

 

http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/class/class.htm

 


 

 

20120208

 

Snow was falling last night across the area and we had a full moon. The ironic thing about this full moon is it was called a "snow moon." In February we usually see the heaviest snows and native tribes in the north and east called it the "Full Snow Moon" or "Full Hunger Moon" because the harsh weather conditions made hunting very difficult.

Here is a picture of the "Snow Moon" over the Capital in Washington D.C. last night.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/post/the-spectacular-full-snow-moon-over-washington-dc/2012/02/08/gIQAiZSuyQ_blog.html

 

Here is a list of full moons per month…

Full Moon Names and Their Meanings

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac's list of the full Moon names.

Full Wolf Moon – January Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January's full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.

Full Snow Moon – February Since the heaviest snow usually falls during this month, native tribes of the north and east most often called February's full Moon the Full Snow Moon. Some tribes also referred to this Moon as the Full Hunger Moon, since harsh weather conditions in their areas made hunting very difficult.

Full Worm Moon – March As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

Full Pink Moon – April This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month's celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

Full Flower Moon – May In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.

Full Strawberry Moon – June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

The Full Buck Moon – July July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month's Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

Full Sturgeon Moon – August The fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.

Full Corn Moon or Full Harvest Moon – September This full moon's name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.

Full Hunter's Moon or Full Harvest Moon – October This full Moon is often referred to as the Full Hunter's Moon, Blood Moon, or Sanguine Moon. Many moons ago, Native Americans named this bright moon for obvious reasons. The leaves are falling from trees, the deer are fattened, and it's time to begin storing up meat for the long winter ahead. Because the fields were traditionally reaped in late September or early October, hunters could easily see fox and other animals that come out to glean from the fallen grains. Probably because of the threat of winter looming close, the Hunter's Moon is generally accorded with special honor, historically serving as an important feast day in both Western Europe and among many Native American tribes.

Full Beaver Moon – November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.

The Full Cold Moon; or the Full Long Nights Moon – December During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.


Here is a link to this article.... http://www.farmersalmanac.com/full-moon-names/

 

 


 

 

20120202

 

Happy Groundhog Day!!!!!

 

The party was in full swing this morning in Punxsutawney PA and Phil made his appearance this morning. He saw his shadow at 7:25 AM EST (6:25 AM CST). If he sees his shadow then that means 6 more weeks of winter. Since the beginning of Phil's predictions he has seen his shadow 99 times and not only 17 time with 9 years of missing data. If that's the truth then we can handle a winter like we have been seeing! There are also other groundhogs prognosticators across the country and world.

 

 

 

 

Staten Island Chuck did not see his shadow so maybe an early spring in New York State?

 

In Canada Nova Scotia's Shubenacadie Sam and Ontario's Wiarton Willie did not see their shadows so an early winter in our friendly neighbors to the north.

 

Protest have broken out today from other groundhogs who are jealous of Phil I think this is his brother leading the charge. Occupy Phil rallies were peaceful today but this picture sums it up.

 

 

 


 

 

 

20120201

 

Groundhog Day Blizzard 2011..

 

What a difference one year can make. Last year at this time we were getting pounded with a powerful winter storm that dumped over a foot of snow along and to the west of I-55 and ice in southeastern Illinois. Here are some of the highlights from this day a year ago!

 

Here is a map that shows 3 day snow totals ending February 3rd at 8 AM across the Midwest.

Notice the heaviest snow fell along the Illinois River and into the western counties.

 

 

The map below is a look at the watches/warnings/advisory across the lower 48 on the morning of Feb 1st.

 

Red-Blizzard Warnings

Pink- Winter Storm Warnings

Purple- Winter Weather Advisory

Yellow- Severe Thunderstorm Watch

Brown- Wind Advisory

The blizzard warnings extended from central Oklahoma to Michigan. The Winter Storm Warnings stretched from New Mexico to Maine. On the southern side of this system severe weather was moving across Louisiana with severe thunderstorm watches and a warning along the coast.

Here in central Illinois records were broken with this snowstorm.

City                             County            total Snow                    old 24 hour record

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Winchester                Scott                  18"                             13" (Feb 28, 1990)

Havana                      Mason                16"                            14.6" (Dec 1, 2006)

Beardstown               Cass                  13.5"                          12" (Jan 30, 1939)

Jacksonville                Morgan               12" Tie                      12" (Feb 28, 1900)

Normal                       McLean               12" Tie                      12" (Jan 2, 1999)

Mason City                 Mason                 10"                            9"  (Feb 1, 2008)

Not only did we have to deal with the ice and snow but the wind kicked up as the system pulled away knocking out power and drifting the snow causing roadways to be closed.Here are some of the wind gusts reported:

Bloomington CIRA: 53 mph

Lincoln Logan County Airport: 53 mph

Rantoul Aviation Center: 52 mph

Peoria Airport: 52 mph

Decatur Airport: 51 mph

Springfield Aiport: 48 mph

Jacksonville Airport: 46 mph

 


Here are the totals from this map that are official numbers:

INCHES  LOCATION             COUNTY       
------  -------------------  -----------  
 19.3   ST DAVID              FULTON
 18.5   AVON 5NE              FULTON
 18.0   WINCHESTER            SCOTT
 17.9   PRINCEVILLE 2W        PEORIA
 17.0   GERMANTOWN HILLS      WOODFORD
 16.0   HAVANA                MASON
 16.0   RUSHVILLE             SCHUYLER
 15.9   BRADFORD 3SSE         MARSHALL
 15.4   TOULON                STARK
 15.0   GALESBURG             KNOX
 15.0   PEORIA                PEORIA
 14.8   KNOXVILLE             KNOX
 14.4   MORTON                TAZEWELL
 14.3   MACKINAW 1N           TAZEWELL
 14.2   CAMP GROVE 2SW        STARK
 13.6   BEARDSTOWN            CASS
 13.0   BLOOMINGTON 5W        MCLEAN
 13.0   CHENOA                MCLEAN
 13.0   LAKE SPRINGFIELD      SANGAMON
 13.0   NORMAL 4NE            MCLEAN
 12.5   STANFORD 2S           MCLEAN
 12.0   JACKSONVILLE 2E       MORGAN
 12.0   ROANOKE               WOODFORD
 12.0   LINCOLN NWS           LOGAN
 12.0   SHERMAN               SANGAMON
 11.6   SPRINGFIELD 2         SANGAMON
 10.4   JACKSONVILLE 2        MORGAN
 10.0   MASON CITY 2N         MASON
  9.3   MOUNT PULASKI         LOGAN
  8.2   FISHER                CHAMPAIGN
  8.0   FARMER CITY 3W        DE WITT
  8.0   SAYBROOK              MCLEAN
  7.0   DECATUR               MACON
  7.0   HOOPESTON 1NE         VERMILION
  6.9   URBANA                CHAMPAIGN
  6.0   TUSCOLA               DOUGLAS
  5.8   OGDEN                 CHAMPAIGN
  4.0   SHELBYVILLE DAM       SHELBY
  4.0   TAYLORVILLE 2SW       CHRISTIAN
  3.0   LOVINGTON            , MOULTRIE
  3.0   PANA 3E               SHELBY
  2.0   WINDSOR               SHELBY
  2.0   CASEY                 CLARK
  1.5   EFFINGHAM             EFFINGHAM
  1.5   NEWTON 1W             JASPER
  0.4   ROBINSON              CRAWFORD

Here are coop reports that ILX considered official are bold and * but other numbers are not official.

INCHES  LOCATION             COUNTY   
------  -------------------  ---------
 20.0   1 N ABINGDON ,  , ;       KNOX     
 15.2** 1 SW JEROME          SANGAMON 
 15.6   BRYANT               FULTON   
 14.7   HOPEWELL             MARSHALL
 14.0   HENRY                MARSHALL 
 14.0   7 W PETERSBURG       MENARD   
 13.0   5 W BLOOMINGTON      MCLEAN 
 13.0   GRIDLEY              MCLEAN  
 12.5   1 S MOSSVILLE        PEORIA   
 12.0   CHATHAM              SANGAMON 
 12.0   MANITO               MASON    
 12.0   LINCOLN              LOGAN    
 12.0   4 NE NORMAL          MCLEAN   
 11.9   2 ESE NORMAL         MCLEAN   
 11, .7   3 SW BLOOMINGTON     MCLEAN
 11.5** FRANKLIN             MORGAN
 11.0   ELLISVILLE           FULTON   
  9.0   1 S OREANA           MACON    
  7.0   1 NNE MAHOMET        CHAMPAIGN
  6.0   1 SSW CHAMPAIGN      CHAMPAIGN
  5.0   AUBURN               SANGAMON 
  4.2   2 N HOMER            CHAMPAIGN
  3.0** MATTOON              COLES
  1.5** NEOGA                CUMBERLAND

 

 

 

 

The red dots are Freezing Rain totals and the blue is sleet totals.

 

Sleet Totals:

INCHES  LOCATION             COUNTY       
------  -------------------  ----------- 
  4.00   TUSCOLA              DOUGLAS   
  4.00   2 SW TAYLORVILLE     CHRISTIAN  
  2.00   CASEY                CLARK     
  2.00   WINDSOR              SHELBY
  1.20   OGDEN                CHAMPAIGN

 

Freezing Rain Totals:

INCHES  LOCATION             COUNTY        
------  -------------------  ----------- 
  0.75   2 S MOWEAQUA         SHELBY
  0.50   EFFINGHAM            EFFINGHAM   
  0.50   MOONSHINE            CLARK       
  0.50   LOVINGTON            MOULTRIE
  0.50   PALESTINE            CRAWFORD    
  0.40   NEWTON         &n, bsp;     JASPER      
  0.25   2 E BIRDS            LAWRENCE
  0.20   LOAMI                SANGAMON   

Here are the unofficial numbers:

Sleet Totals:

INCHES  LOCATION             COUNTY       
------  -------------------  ----------- 
  4.20   CHAMPAIGN            CHAMAPAIGN
  4.00   2 S DECATUR          MACON
  4.00   3 S NEWMAN           DOUGLAS
  3.00   DANVILLE             VERMILION
  2.50   MATTOON              COLES
  2.00   2 N HOMER            CHAMPAIGN   
  0.75   CHARLESTON           COLES
  0.50   SHELBYVILLE          SHELBY
  0.40   WATSON               EFFINGHAM

Freezing Rain Totals:

INCHES  LOCATION             COUNTY        
------  -------------------  ----------- 
  0.60   CHARLESTON           COLES
  0.60   EFFINGHAM            EFFINGHAM
  0.50   FLORA                CLAY 
  0.40   AUBURN               SANGAMON       
  0.30   LANE                 DE WITT
  0.30   NEOGA                CUMBERLAND
  0.30   OLNEY                RICHLAND
  0.30   PANA                 CHRISTIAN
  0.30   ROBINSON             CRAWFORD
  0.20   MACON                MACON
  0.20   MOUNT ZION           MACON
  0.20   SULLIVAN             MOULTRIE
  0.20   TAYLORVILLE          CHRISTIAN    
  0.10   NEWMAN               DOUGLAS      
  0.12   CHATHAM              SANGAMON

 

The map below shows the statewide snow totals from Coop observers:

 

 

 

 

The final shot is a high resolution Satellite image showing the snow cover across the area. You can see the details of the rivers and lakes cut out where snow is minimal.

 

 

 

 

For the complete article head to this link from the Nation Wether Service in Lincoln...

 

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/ilx/?n=01feb2011

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20120131

 

Good bye to January and it was an interesting month weather wise!

 

January 2012 Climate report

 

January got off to a mild start with highs in the lower 50's on New Years Day. January also ended on the mild side with highs climbing into the 50's and 60's area wide. To best describe this month would be to call it a roller coaster ride. Severe Weather Thunderstorms made an early appearance with the first Tornado Watch of the 2012 country wide issued on January 22nd for Accounting, Montgomery and Fayette Counties. Here's how the numbers stacked up below.

 

Avg Recorded High: 42.90                         Avg Recorded Low: 25.41

Avg Jan High: 34.15                                    Avg Jan Low: 17.09

-----------------------------------                    --------------------------------------

+8.39                                                           +8.32

 

Avg Recorded Mean: 34.15

Avg Jan Mean: 25.8

-------------------------------------

+8.35

 

Warmest High: 63 Jan 6th

Warmest Low: 46 Jan 31st

Coolest High: 20 Jan 13th

Coolest Low: 9 Jan 14th and 20th

 

Days, with high temps:                                               Days with low temps:

60's: 2 days                                                                 40's: 2 days

50's: 9 days                                                                 30's: 10 days

40's: 6 days                                                                 20's: 10 days

30's: 9 days                                                                 10's: 7 days

20's: 5 days                                                                 +0: 2 days

                                                                                     -0: 0 days

 

8 days we saw temps at or below 32 for highs

6 nights were above 32

 

Snow Days:

--------------------------

 2"    Jan 12th

T      Jan 14th

T      Jan 20th Sleet and Freezing Rain

T      Jan 27th Sleet/Freezing Rain/Rain

 

Jan 2012 Total Precipitation: 1.22"

Jan Average Precipitation: 2.22"

-----------------------------------------------

     -1.00" below

 

 

 


 

 

 

20120125

 

A big shout out to my Mom tonight as its her birthday. Have a safe and great weekend!!!!!

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

20120124

 

CME Impact on Earth and continued solar storm

 

CME IMPACT: As expected, a CME (Coronal Mass Ejection) hit Earth's magnetic field on Jan. 24th at approximately 1500 UT (9 am CST). A G1-class geomagnetic storm is in progress now, producing bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Sky watchers in Canada, Alaska, and states along the US-Canadian border should be alert for Northern Lights after nightfall. Tip: The hours around local midnight are often best for aurora sightings.

 

Our Kp Index is at 5 right now. Here is an explanation of the Kp Index from spaceweather.com

 

Looks like the aurora will stay just to our north tonight but still worth check out to see if we can get a view tonight.

 

 

 

 

In this article we briefly explain some of the ideas behind the association of the aurora with geomagnetic activity and a bit about how the ‘K-index' or ‘K-factor' works. The aurora is understood to be caused by the interaction of high energy particles (usually electrons) with neutral atoms in the earth's upper atmosphere. These high energy particles can ‘excite' (by collisions) valence electrons that are bound to the neutral atom. The ‘excited' electron can then ‘de-excite' and return back to its initial, lower energy state, but in the process it releases a photon (a light particle). The combined effect of many photons being released from many atoms results in the aurora display that you see.

The details of how high energy particles are generated during geomagnetic storms constitute an entire discipline of space science in its own right. The basic idea, however, is that the Earth's magnetic field (let us say the ‘geomagnetic field') is responding to a outwardly propagating disturbance from the Sun. As the geomagnetic field adjusts to this disturbance, various components of the Earth's field change form, releasing magnetic energy and thereby accelerating charged particles to high energies. These particles, being charged, are forced to stream along the geomagnetic field lines. Some end up in the upper part of the earth's neutral atmosphere and the auroral mechanism begins.

The disturbance of the geomagnetic field may also be measured by an instrument called a magnetometer. At our operations center we receive magnetometer data from dozens of observatories in one minute intervals. The data is received at or near to ‘real-time' and allows us to keep track of the current state of the geomagnetic conditions. In order to reduce the amount of data that our customers have to deal with we convert the magnetometer data into three-hourly indices which give a quantitative, but less detailed measure of the level of geomagnetic activity. The K-index scale has a range from 0 to 9 and is directly related to the maximum amount of fluctuation (relative to a quiet day) in the geomagnetic field over a three-hour interval.

The K-index is therefore updated every three hours and the information is made available to our customers as soon as possible. The K-index is also necessarily tied to a specific geomagnetic observatory. For locations where there are no observatories, one can only estimate what the local K-index, would be by looking at data from the nearest observatory, but this would be subject to some errors from time to time because geomagnetic activity is not always spatially homogenous. Another item of interest is that the location of the aurora usually changes geomagnetic latitude as the intensity of the geomagnetic storm changes. The location of the aurora often takes on an ‘oval-like' shape and is appropriately called the auroral oval. A useful map of the approximate location of the auroral oval as a function of the Kp-index was published in the June 1968 copy Sky & Telescope (see page 348). The Kp index is derived through by an algorithm that essentially averages the K-indices from several stations. Note that as a storm becomes more intense, the edge of the, auroral boundary typically moves to lower latitudes.

For further reading we can recommend a couple of books for you. An old, but classic text is The Polar Aurora, Oxford University Press, 1955, by Störmer. A more modern text is The Physics of Space Plasmas, 1991, by George Parks. This information was published in Sky & Telescope (June 1968)

 

 

 

 

 

20120123

 


 

Strong Solar Storm Affecting Earth

Strong Solar Storm Affecting Earth

A strong solar flare erupted from the sun Sunday evening and continues to affect the earth. The NWS Space Weather Prediction Center is currently monitoring the storm and posting updates to their page and to FaceBook.  The impacts of this storm are considered minimal and will be relegated to the Earth's poles, where aircraft communications may be degraded along with potential flight rerouting.

The eruption, seen in this image below, is the strongest since September 2005. 

n addition to the flare, a Coronal Mass Ejection accompanied the flare.  A geomagnetic storm is a near certainty from this event, with G2 (Moderate) levels expected to start around 900 am EST Tuesday, continuing into Wednesday.

This could pose an impact to power grids, where voltage corrections may be required along with false alarms triggered on some protective devices. Intermittent satellite navigation and low-frequency radio navigation problems may occur.

With strong geomagnetic storms possible, high-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras.

check out the link on www.crh.noaa.gov/ilx

RADIATION STORM IN PROGRESS: Solar protons accelerated by this morning's M9-class solar flare are streaming past Earth. On the NOAA scale of radiation storms, this one ranks S3, which means it could, e.g., cause isolated reboots of computers onboard Earth-orbiting satellites and interfere with polar radio communications. An example of satellite effects: The "snow" in this SOHO coronagraph movie is caused by protons hitting the observatory's onboard camera.

ALMOST-X FLARE AND CME (UPDATED): This morning, Jan. 23rd around 0359 UT, big sunspot 1402 erupted, producing a long-duration M9-class solar flare. The explosion's M9-ranking puts it on the threshold of being an X-flare, the most powerful kind. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the flare's extreme ultraviolet flash:

 

 

 

The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft detected a CME rapidly emerging from the blast site: movie. Analysts at the God, dard Space Weather Lab say the leading edge of the CME will reach Earth on Jan. 24 at 14:18UT (+/- 7 hours). Their animated forecast track shows that Mars is in the line of fire, too; the CME will hit the Red Planet during the late hours of Jan. 25.

This is a relatively substantial and fast-moving (2200 km/s) CME. Spacecraft in geosynchronous, polar and other orbits passing through Earth's ring current and auroral regions could be affected by the cloud's arrival. In addition, strong geomagnetic storms are possible, so high-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras. Magnetic storm alerts: text, voice.

JAN. 22ND CME IMPACT: Arriving a little later than expected, a coronal mass ejection (CME) hit Earth's magnetic field at 0617 UT on Jan. 22nd. According to analysts at the Goddard Space Weather Lab, the CME strongly compressed Earth's magnetic field and briefly exposed satellites in geosynchronous orbit to solar wind p, lasma. For the next 24 hours, Earth's magnetic field reverberated from the impact, stirring bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Bjørn Jørgensen observed this display from Tromsø, Norway:

 

 

For more information check out spaceweather.com

 

Sizzle Out!!


 

 

20120119

 

Another shot of winter will set in tomorrow afternoon. Here is a graphic of what I feel will happen. The drive to work tomorr, ow will be smooth sailing but the drive home from work might pose a little more of a challenge. Just give yourself a little extra time.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

20120112

 

&nbs, p;

Light Snow and Blowing Snow will the rule for the night across the area. Temps have fallen into the lower to middle teens across the area and with the wind out of the NW around 20-25 mph Wind Chill Values have dipped to zero even below zero.

Winter Weather Advisory remains until 6 AM tomorrow morning for much of the area!

We saw a dry slot develop this afternoon shutting down the snow across muc...h of the area but now the wrap around snows will work back in for the evening and overnight. The area of low pressure is now off to our SE in Kentucky but the 850mb low is back in SE Indiana this evening which is helping to wrap some snow back across the CI. The heaviest of the snow bands should remain north of I-74 but for most of us we could expect to see maybe another half inch in areas along and to the north of Il-16 with another inch closer to I-72 to I-74. The wind is expected to stay up this evening keeping the wind chill value near or below zero and reducing visibilities across the entire area. If you have to travel tonight please use extreme caution and give yourself plenty of extra time to get to your destination.

Tomorrow the snow will have ended but temperatures will struggle to warm near 20 in most areas with clouds being the rule for the day. We might get a sneak peak at some sunshine later in the day. Our attention turns then to a clipper that will drop out of the Dakotas and bring back a chance for some snow on Saturday afternoon. The way things look now we might see another inch of accumulation but the models do have a hard time with QPF's totals with clippers. These systems usually have a ratio of 18:1 so it will be another fluffy snow but the wind won't be much of a factor. Temps do rebound above freezing on Sunday with highs into the middle 30's.

Monday evening into Tuesday another system will eject out of the Pacific Northwest and bring a chance for some rain on Monday. This system will pull up warm air out ahead of the storm driving temperatures back into the middle 40's. As cold air digs in on the back side of the system there looks to be enough moisture to change the rain over to snow. I am not throwing numbers out with this system yet just want to see how it evolves over the next few runs. The pattern looks to be very active next week with another storm showing up Thursday bring another shot at some snow and keeping temperatures in the lower 30's for high's.

 

Snow Totals...

  

Bloomington 4.1"

  

Springfield 3"

  

Clinton 2.8" Kevin Radley

  

Jacksonville 2.8"

  

Ogden 2.5"

  

Charleston 1.7"

  

Arthur 1.5"

  

Send me your snow totals!!!!!

  


 

  

  

20120111

  

Winter is about to show up here in central Illinois. Snow and blowing snow will be our main threats and I am starting to get more comfortable with timing of arrival and snow totals.

 

West of I-55 expect snow to show up early morning 5 am to 6 am.

I-55 to US 51 around 6 am to 7 am.

US 51 to I-57 around 7 am to 8 am.

I-57 to IL/IN boarder 8 am to 9 am.

 

Snow Totals Forecast.....

 

I-74 north could expect to see 3" to 5" with heavier amounts into the Fox valley and south suburbs.

I-74 to I-70 could see 1"to 3" with the heaviest closer to I-74.

South of I-70 around 1" possible.

I am going to be watching the system closely and will let you know if I adjust these totals.

 

The morning commute should be good but the evening commute will be a different story. Temperatures will start around 29 and then tumble through the day. The wind will start to pick up, blowing the snow causing reduced visibilities. The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Weather Advisory for most of the Stormcenter 17 viewing area. This was issued for snow and blowing snow that will reduce visibilities due to falling snow and blowing snow. Use cation when traveling especially in open areas!

 

Winter Weather Advisory from 6 am Thursday until 6 am Friday for Cass, Logan, Menard, Morgan, Sangamon, and Scott counties

 

Winter Weather Advisory from 9 am Thursday until 9 am Friday for, Champaign, Christian, Cumberland, Coles, DeWitt, Douglas, Edgar, Effingham, Ford, Iroquois, Macon, McLean, Moultrie, Piatt, Shelby, Vermilion.

 

Temperatures will start around 29 tomorrow then drop to 25 at noon and for the drive home 22 with wind chill value in the single digits. The wind will be out of the NW 20 to 25 mph with gusts to 30 mph.

 

The extended forecast I have added a chance for some light snow Saturday night into Sunday morning as a clipper will drop across the area. Temps will rebound a little into the weekend with highs in the lower to middle 30's and back to 40 by Monday. Another system takes aim at the area Monday evening into Tuesday. I am going to start with a chance of rain Monday evening then as cold air builds in the rain will change to snow by Tuesday morning but too far out now to nail down any details about this system. We need to watch this system because any change in the track will determine precipitation type and how much we could receive.

  

 

  

  


 

 

 

  

  

20120106

  

In 2008 here at Stormcenter 17 we saw a high of 65 Jan 6th then on Jan 7th 68 and finally 61 was recorded on the 8th. We saw highs in the upper 50's and low 60's today so we weren't in territory that is unheard of for January but still way above average. Interesting that the end of January turned colder and then February was very snowy. Only time will tell what happens but with highs staying in the 40's until next Wednesday then reality sets in with highs only in the lower 30's Thursday and Friday!

  


 

 

 

  

20120105

 

 

As we know snow has been very illusive this winter so far. East central Illinois has been the area that has received the most snow so far with totals of around 1" to 2" inches. That system dropped the snow the day after Christmas into the morning of December 27th. Areas across the Ohio Valley have actually seen more snow then we have. This time last year we had received 7.75" of total snowfall for the winter season. The snowiest month of 2011 was February which saw us pick up 15.75" inches. Here is the break down of snow from last winter compared to the beginning of 2011-2012 winter so far. We typically average around 20" of snow for the year.

 

2010-2011 Winter                             2011-2012 Winter

 

November: 0.00"                               November: 0.00"

December: 7.75"                               December: 0.00" (ECI 1" to 2")

January: 8.1                 &nbs, p;                     January: 0.00 as of Jan 5th

February: 15.75

March: Trace

 

Total: 31.6"                                       Total: 0.00" (ECI 1" to 2")

 

Winter is still not over yet but this is an interesting comparison to last year. Last New Years Eve was warm as well with Tornado Warnings in St. Louis and into our southern counties. Then as February arrived we saw a snowy month. Only time will tell how the rest of winter plays out but long range forecasts call for above average temps and above average precip.

 

 

I found this interesting article written by the National Weather Service Lincoln stating how many days since our last at least 1 inch snowfall. Here are a couple numbers that they have listed. Champaign and, Danville are not included because you have already received at least 1 inch snow this season.

 

Lincoln: Last +1 inch snow 2/25/2011 when 1.5" accumulated which is 313 days. This ranks #12 in the records books with the record of 372 days set which was snapped on 2/21/1950.

 

Springfield: Last +1 inch snow 2/25/2011 when 4.2" accumulated which is 313 days. This ranks #20 in the record books with the record of 374 days in which was snapped on 1/14/1924.

 

Here is the link to this interesting article:

 

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/news/display_cmsstory.php?wfo=ilx&storyid=77248&source=0

 


 

    20120105

 

    

Highs have peaked into the mid to upper 50's with a 61 reported in Jacksonville. We will see another warm day as the wind will stay out of the SW tomorrow at about 10 to 15 mph. A cold front associated with a low pressure dropping across the lakes will bring back 40's for highs this weekend. High pressure will build in allowing for plenty of sunshine both Saturday and Sunday. An upper level low will develop to our SW and we need to watch the track to see how far to the north the precip shield will make it plus temp profiles for precip type. I am going to leave the forecast as all rain for the afternoon Wednesday and then a change over to some snow showers Wednesday night into early Thursday morning. Thursday temperatures will return to normal with highs in the lower 30's and cloudy skies but there might be enough moisture left over for a couple flurries but I am going to wait to put that in the wording to get a little more model agreement.

Here is a look at temperatures at 1:43 this afternoon. Look at the 50's and 60's across the midwest. This looks more like an April afternoon.

 

I will be posting about the lack of snow and how long parts of the CI have gone without 1" or more of snow.


 

      20120104   

Temps today have pushed into the lower to middle 40's across much of the area with the coolest readings along the IL/IN boarder. The wind is out of the NW today behind a weak wind shift line (occluded front) that moved through early this morning. We will see the wind turn back out of the south tomorrow and that will drive temps into the lower 50's. This type of weather is what we usually see in late March. Another system will drop in our direction bring cooler temps back to the CI Friday night into Saturday morning. Highs over the weekend will remain in the lower 40's and moisture will be lacking so no precip is expected. Highs early next week will stay in the lower 40's about 5 to 6 degrees above average for this time of the year. A storm system will develop and push north out of the gulf coast that one should stay to our east but another stronger front will move in from the northern Plains and bring a big cool down but the end of next week. I am going to leave the forecast dry for now and wait for a little more model consistency to develop. I will leave Wednesday dry but I might have to introduce a slight chance for some rain/snow in later forecast for Wednesday into Thursday.

   20120103   

 

QUADRANTID METEOR SHOWER: Earth is about to pass through a stream of debris from 2003 EH1, a comet fragment that produces the annual Quadrantid meteor shower. Forecasters expect the shower to peak around 07:20 UT (02:20 am EST) on Wednesday morning, January 4th. At maximum, as many as 100 meteors/hour could emerge from a radiant near Polaris, the north star.

Here is a link to a cool sight about all that space has in store for earth...    http://www.spaceweather.com/    20120103   

Sunshine is out in full force today across the CI! Temps have responded to the sunshine today helping to melt the snow cover (dusting) in east central Illinois today. Temps have topped in the upper 20's to lower 30's area wide. Mild air is going to return as a ridge has developed to our west and that air mass will start to settle in here tomorrow and stay through Friday. High's tomorrow will push into the lower 40's and middle 40's by Thursday. Friday looks to be the warmest day of the week with highs surging into the lower to mid 50's! A cold front will drop across the CI Friday night into Saturday and will bring a cooler air mass with it. Lower 40's will be the name of the game this weekend but more sun on Sunday as a few clouds will stay with us on Saturday. The air should be dry enough to limit any chances for precip on Saturday. Another ridge will develop by the first of next week as highs will once again push into the lower to middle 40's. A wave will develop along the Texas coast on Monday and need to be watched track wise but as of now it looks to stay well to our south.

   20111222    Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!!!    Today is my last day of 2011!!!!! Have a very special blessed Merry Christmas and a Happy and successful New Year.          20111221    Tonight at 11:30 winter will arrive!!!!

 

The astrological start to winter based on the Gregorian calendar will be with the winter solstice this year will occur on December 21st at 11:30 PM CDT in central Illinois or December 22nd at 5:30 AM UTC in Europe ( UTC is the standard time across the globe). This occurs when the North Pole is tilts 23.5 degrees away from the sun. The suns direct rays will be shining on 23.5 degrees south or the on the tropic of Capricorn (southern hemisphere).  All places 66.5 degrees north will see total darkness and all places south of 66.5 degrees south will see 24 hours of complete light.

      Here is a link to the complete article if you want to read more.   http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/december-solstice.html    20111213    Happy Birthday to my middle brother Andrew. I can't believe that he is 23 today!    In other news here is today's forecast summary...   

 

Rain is our main weather story over the next 48 hours. Temps will start to really warm during the day tomorrow as highs will make it into the upper 50's with some places pushing near 60. A cold front wil, l slide across the area which will bring showers and thunderstorms. Gusty winds and some small hail will be the main threat with these storms. Once the front goes through a mild start to the day on Thursday is on tap with temps dropping in the afternoon. I'm watching a storm system for the first of next week which will bring us rain on Monday and then I am going to leave it as rain on Tuesday but we need to watch precip type. Still watching the extended models for any sign of snow for Christmas and there is a little hint of a storm system a few days before but so far out still so lets not get too excited yet.

      20111202   

 

Happy Friday!!!!

November is in the books and it ended up warm and wet!

The November numbers are in…..

 

Average high: 52                                   Average low: 41.8                                                         

 Recorded high: 55.9                                Recorded low: 32.8

------------------------------                       -----------------------------

  +3.9 above average                                      +9 above average 

 

 

                                    Average Mean: 42.15

                                    Recorded Mean: 48.85

                                  --------------------------------

        ,                                     +6.7 above average

 

 

November Recorded Precipitation: 3.68

Average November Precipitation: 2.74

-------------------------------------------------

             +.94" above average

 

The good news about the above average precipitation is that we are out of the drought conditions and with more rain expected for Sunday this will continue to help!

This weekend will start off on the warm side as we will watch an area of low pressure come out of Texas and ride just to our northwest. This track of the low will keep us in the warm sector of the storm so no snow is in the forecast. Temperatures tomorrow will warm to 55 and then as the cold front shows up Saturday evening rain will increase and continue through Sunday early afternoon. Rain totals should range from .50" to .75" acro, ss , much of the area. Temperatures on Sunday will start in the upper 40's and then slide through the afternoon before settling into the 20's by Monday morning. Cold arctic air will arrive and stay with us through next week with highs in the 30's. I am watching a system that will move along the Ohio River for Monday and could bring a couple snow flakes to places along and to the south of I-70 but we need to watch and make sure the track of that systems stays south. If the track deviated by a little to the north then we might have to add a chance in for some light snow showers on Monday afternoon. We will keep an eye in it.

I'm off all next week so I might pop in and update the blog a couple times but if you are in the area watching basketball you might see me officiating a few games. Have a great and safe weekend!

 


     20111201    Hello December!!!!   

Had a great time in the Clinton Christmas Parade and it was great to see everyone. Radar was a hit as always!!! It's a beautiful start to meteorological winter across the CI today with plenty of sunshine and pleasant temps. Some of you have asked what is meteorological winter?  The seasons for us meteorologist is done a little differently it's divided by quarters with December, January and February being winter. If we look back at the records that usually when we see the most winter , weather but sometimes it will carry over into March. March, April and May is Spring, June, July and August Summer and finally fall is September, October and November. 

The astrological start to winter based on the Gregorian calendar will be with the winter solstice this year will occur on December 21st at 11:30 PM CDT in central Illinois or December 22nd at 5:30 AM UTC in Europe ( UTC is the standard time across the globe). This occurs when the North Pole is tilts 23.5 degrees away from the sun. The suns direct rays will be shining on 23.5 degrees south or the on the tropic of Capricorn (southern hemisphere).  All places 66.5 degrees north will see total darkness and all places south of 66.5 degrees south will see 24 hours of complete light.

              Here is a link to the complete article if you want to read more.   http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/december-solstice.html     

 







 

  

  

20120110

  

 

Mild weather has been the name of the game so far for January across the Prairie State. I'm watching two storms one to our south and another one across the northern Rockies this evening. The one to our south will start to lift out of the Arklatex area this evening and bring some rain chances across central Illinois by tomorrow morning with the rain shield staying along and to the south of I-72. Places along and to the northwest of I-55 should remain dry and might get to see a little sunshine tomorrow which would allow temps to rebound back near 50. For us in the rain high temps will remain in the upper 40's.

 

The second system is on schedule to move in here Wednesday night into Thursday morning bringing with it cold arctic air and snow chances. The low will start to deepen as it moves across the upper Midwest. The question becomes, where does the dry slot set up limiting snow totals and how much moisture will wrap around for Thursday afternoon? I am going to say area snow totals could range from ¾" to 1" with heavier amounts along and north of I-74. We will be watching this system closely but expect your drive to work on Thursday morning to be a little slick and very windy. Temps with this powerful cold front will tumble into the 20's fo, r highs Thursday and Friday with morning lows into the teens. This will be a little shock to our systems and a reminder that winter is still here.


 

20120109

 

 

Happy Monday hope your weekend was a great one. Sunshine is the main weather story for today and into tomorrow along with mild temperatures. Highs today will peak in the upper 40's and tomorrow will sneak into the low 50's. The jet is once again in a split flow pattern with the one branch locking away cold air and another branch driving a storm system that is developing in Mexico. The storm in Mex...ico will come into Texas today and then move into the Tennessee Valley by Wednesday morning bringing some rain up into southern Illinois. Most of the moisture will stay along and to the south of I-70 but we can't rule out a shower at least in the morning. Then our focus shifts to Thursday with a strong cold front that will push across the CI bringing a chance for some snow showers and bringing a blast of cold air with it. Hi, ghs Thursday and Friday will be in the 20's! We will see a little recovery by Saturday and Sunday as highs will rebound into the lower to middle 30's. Lets enjoy these couple of days of warmth because reality is about to return

&nbs, p;

 

January has been off to a warm start so far here in central Illinois. I have looked at the last 8 days and here is how it breaks down.

 

The coldest high temp was 31 on Jan 2nd

The coldest low temp was 14 on Jan 3rd

The Warmest high temp was 63 on Jan 6th

The Warmest low temp was 42 on Jan 6th

 

2012

 

Recorded High Average: 46.6                            Recorded Low Average: 29.1

Average High: 34.5                                             Average Low: 17.3

-------------------------------                                 -----------------------------------------

      +12.1 above average                                          +11.8 above average

 

 

                                       Recorded Mean: 37.85

                                       Average Mean: 25.9

                                   ---------------------------------

                                           +11.95 above average

 

It will be interesting to see how the rest of the month of January plays out!

 
Powered by WorldNow

904 South Side Drive
Decatur, IL 62521
Primary Phone: 217-424-2500
Primary Email: news@wandtv.com

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014, WorldNow and WAND. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms