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Rookie Luis García showed the poise of an October ace, MVP Yordan Alvarez stayed hot at the plate and the Houston Astros earned yet another trip to the World Series, beating the Boston Red Sox 5-0 in Game 6 of the AL Championship Series. The Astros advanced to the World Series for the third … More >>

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An assistant director of the film “Rust” told Alec Baldwin that a weapon he gave him was safe to use in the moments before the actor fatally shot a cinematographer, according to court documents in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Instead, the gun was loaded with live rounds. When Baldwin pulled the trigger Thursday on the set of a Western, he killed 42-year-old cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. The sheriff’s office obtained the warrant so investigators could document the scene where the shooting took place. They sought to examine Baldwin’s blood-stained costume for the film “Rust” as evidence. More >>

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Northern California residents are cleaning up Friday and preparing for a massive storm this weekend that could bring flash flooding to vast areas scorched by fire. Residents had been relieved when rain started falling this week for the first time in any measurable way since spring, helping contain stubborn wildfires and soaking dry gardens. The National Weather Service for the San Francisco Bay Area issued a flash flood watch for parts of the region Sunday. Rain and snow will soak northern and central California before spreading into Southern California Monday. This week’s storms won’t end the drought that’s plaguing California and the western United States.    More >>

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Federal scientists say kid-size doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine appear highly effective at preventing symptomatic infections among elementary school children. The Food and Drug Administration posted its review late Friday ahead of a public meeting to consider opening vaccinations to kids 5 to 11. FDA scientists concluded that in almost every scenario the vaccine’s overall benefit for children would outweigh any serious potential side effects. The FDA will ask an outside panel of experts to review its analysis and vote on whether to recommend the shots next week. If regulators authorize the low-dose shots, vaccinations could begin early next month.  More >>

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Court records show that an assistant director unwittingly handed Alec Baldwin a loaded weapon and told him it was safe to use in the moments before the actor fatally shot a cinematographer. The assistant director referred to the gun as “cold," according to a search warrant filed Friday in a Santa Fe, New Mexico, court. Instead, the gun was loaded with live rounds. When Baldwin pulled the trigger Thursday on the set of a Western, he killed 42-year-old cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. The sheriff’s office obtained the warrant so investigators could document the scene where the shooting took place. They sought to examine Baldwin’s blood-stained costume for the film “Rust." More >>

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A woman pretended she owned a Southern California home so a locksmith would make her new keys. Then police locked her up. Officers arrested a 43-year-old woman on suspicion of burglary Thursday night in Coronado, a resort city across the bay from San Diego. The brazen burglary was foiled when the real homeowner called Coronado police and said her neighbor noticed suspicious activity at the home. The homeowner was out of town, yet the neighbor saw the home’s lights being turned on and off. Officers arrived and the neighbor — a relative of the homeowner’s — gave them a spare key. But it didn’t fit the front door’s lock. More >>

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Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins died Thursday after Alec Baldwin fired a loaded weapon that was handed to him by an assistant director who indicated it was safe to use on the New Mexico set of “Rust.” Director Joel Souza was also hit and injured but has since been released from the hospital. The sheriff’s department is investigating and many things are still unknown. On movie sets, weapons masters are in charge of the weapons and must be present when a weapon is being used. And according to guidelines of the Actors’ Equity Association, firearms must be loaded by the prop master, armorer or experienced persons working under their direct supervision. More >>

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The Phoenix Suns have released a statement regarding a potential media investigation into the workplace culture of the franchise, denying that the organization or owner Robert Sarver have a history of racism or sexism. The statement says the organization is aware that ESPN is working on a story accusing the organization of misconduct on a “variety of topics.” The Suns responded by saying they were “completely baseless claims.” Sarver has owned the Suns since 2004.  More >>

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Authorities say gunshots rang out across several streets during a shooting that killed four people in a neighborhood in Tacoma, Washington. A search for a suspect or suspects in the Thursday afternoon killings continued Friday. Investigators have not yet said what led to the violence outside a residence on the city’s east side in the Salishan neighborhood. Authorities haven't released their names. But The News Tribune reports relatives confirmed Friday that 42-year-old Maria Nunez; her 19-year-old son, Emery Iese; Nunez’s brother, 22-year-old Raymond Williams; and Williams’ 22-year-old girlfriend, Natasha Brincefield, died in the shooting. Police had released their ages and genders. More >>

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The cinematographer who was fatally shot with a prop gun by Alec Baldwin on a movie set grew up on a Soviet military base in the Arctic Circle and worked on documentary films in Europe before studying film in Los Angeles. Halyna Hutchins was 42. She identified herself on Instagram as a “restless dreamer” and “adrenaline junkie.” According to her website, she grew up surrounded by reindeer and nuclear submarines. She received a graduate degree in international journalism from Kyiv National University in Ukraine, worked on British documentary productions in Eastern Europe and graduated from the American Film Institute Conservatory in 2015. More >>

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U.S. health officials may have solved the mystery of how four people in different states came down with a serious tropical disease, even though none had traveled internationally. The four people may have been infected by an aromatherapy spray imported from India. Two of them died. One was a child. The others were from Kansas, Minnesota and Texas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that its scientists found the same type of bacteria that causes the disease in an aromatherapy spray found in the Georgia patient’s home. The spray was made in India. The Consumer Product Safety Commission and Walmart issued a recall Friday for 3,900 bottles of the spray.  More >>

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Drought fueled by climate change has dropped Lake Tahoe below its natural rim and halted flows into the Truckee River. It's an historically cyclical event but it's occurring sooner and more often than it used to. Scientists are concerned that the growing frequency of low-water extremes may become the new normal. Since summer, boat ramps have been closed. Docks sit precariously above the receding lake. Truckee River rafting operations ended early. The Forest Service canceled this month’s kokanee salmon festival at South Tahoe's Taylor Creek because low water has all but cut off the fish migration route. Another dismal snowpack season could make things worse next year. More >>

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A jury weighing the fate of fallen Silicon Valley star Elizabeth Holmes has had its first chance to listen to recordings of her boasting to investors about purported breakthroughs in blood-testing technology. The technology heralded as a quantum leap in blood testing later dissolved into a scandal that threatens to send her to prison. The drama unfolded Friday with federal prosecutors playing a series of recordings from a December 2013 conference call Holmes held with investors in Theranos, a biotechnology company she started as a 19 year old. The clips capped the sixth week of a high-profile trial revolving around allegations that Holmes duped sophisticated investors and major retailers with bogus promises about Theranos' technology.  More >>

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A federal civil rights investigation found widespread racial harassment of Black and Asian American students at a Utah school district, including hundreds of documented uses of the N-word and other racial epithets over the last five years. The probe released Thursday by the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division also found physical assaults, derogatory racial comments and harsher discipline for students of color at Davis School District. The district has acknowledged incidents were not handled appropriately and agreed to take several steps as part of a settlement agreement, including a new department to handle complaints, more training and data collection. More >>

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and two other legislators have reintroduced a bill in the House to put immigrants who cleared debris after the Sept. 11 attacks on a fast track to legal immigration status in the U.S. Immigrants in New York who worked after the attacks have long asked to obtain legal immigration status as a way to compensate for the subsequent health problems they have suffered. But 20 years after 9/11, only several dozens are still participating in protests and making the request, while others have abandoned that fight. Prospects for passage of the bill even with Democratic control of Congress are highly uncertain. More >>

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Earlier this year, an insistent cry arose from business leaders and Republican governors: Cut off a $300-a-week federal supplement for unemployed Americans. Many people, they argued, would then come off the sidelines and take the millions of jobs that employers were desperate to fill. Yet three months after half the states began ending that federal payment, there’s been no significant influx of job seekers. In states that cut off the $300 check, the workforce — the number of people who either have a job or are looking for one — has risen no more than it has in the states that maintained the payment. More >>

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Earlier this year, an insistent cry arose from business leaders and Republican governors: Cut off a $300-a-week federal supplement for unemployed Americans. Many people, they argued, would then come off the sidelines and take the millions of jobs that employers were desperate to fill. Yet three months after half the states began ending that federal payment, there’s been no significant influx of job seekers. In states that cut off the $300 check, the workforce — the number of people who either have a job or are looking for one — has risen no more than it has in the states that maintained the payment. More >>

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A judge in California has ruled that state prison guards who work in and around facilities’ health care settings must be vaccinated against the coronavirus. The judge's decision Friday does not extend to all state prison employees, including guards who work in other settings. The state Department of Public Health in August had ordered the guards, as well as other prison and jail employees who work in correctional health care settings, to get vaccinated. In a separate case, a federal judge last month ordered the state to mandate vaccines for all prison employees and incarcerated people who work outside facilities.  More >>

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A former pastor accused of sexually assaulting two women inside a suburban St. Louis Catholic supply store, then killing a third when she refused his sexual demands has pleaded guilty. Thomas Bruce entered the plea Friday to first-degree murder and other charges in the attacks in Ballwin, Missouri, on Nov. 19, 2018. The plea requires a sentence of life without parole. Bruce was on the run for two days before his arrest. The 56-year-old Bruce is a Navy veteran who operated a nonprofit church in southeast Missouri for four years until it was dissolved in 2007.  More >>

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California regulators' ambitious plan to block new oil and gas wells within 3,200 feet of schools and homes is far from finalized. Environmental groups plan to push the state to do more to close existing wells within that zone over a two-month comment period. The oil industry says it doesn't support the rule because it creates a one-size-fits-all approach for the massive state. The proposal will now go through more than a year of bureaucratic wrangling before it takes effect. It would be the largest buffer zone between drilling and community sites in the nation if adopted. More >>

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Oklahoma Health Commissioner Dr. Lance Frye has announced his resignation from the post. Frye, who was named commissioner in May 2020, is stepping down immediately, the Oklahoma State Department of Health said Friday. The announcement comes a day after state Republican leaders, including Gov. Kevin Stitt, expressed outrage upon learning the health department issued a birth certificate with a nonbinary gender designation. Frye said the certificate was issued as part of a settlement reached under the administration of a former state attorney general. Stitt, who appointed Frye, praised Frye's “steady leadership” in responding to the coronavirus pandemic. More >>

AP

A federal appeals court says a Turkish bank must face criminal charges that it evaded sanctions against Iran by processing billions of dollars of Iranian oil revenue. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Friday. It upheld a decision by District Judge Richard M. Berman. An indictment said the bank illegally moved about $20 billion in Iranian oil and gas revenues. It also said the state-owned bank sometimes disguised money movements as purchases of food and medicine so they’d qualify for a “humanitarian exception” to sanctions. A lawyer for Halkbank declined to comment on the ruling. More >>

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A judge has granted a request from wildlife advocacy groups and blocked Wisconsin's fall wolf hunt two weeks before hunters were set to take to the woods. Dane County Circuit Judge Jacob Frost issued a temporary injunction Friday halting the season, which was set to begin Nov. 6. The order comes as part of a lawsuit wildlife advocacy groups filed in August seeking to stop the hunt and invalidate a state law authorizing annual seasons. The groups sued after the Department of Natural Resources board brushed aside calls to cancel the fall season after hunters exceeded their kill limit by nearly 100 wolves during a court-ordered February season.  More >>

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Peter Scolari, who appeared on the TV series “Newhart” and Girls," has died. His manager says Scolari died Friday morning in New York after fighting cancer for two years. The versatile character actor first gained attention as Tom Hanks’ co-star in the sitcom “Bosom Buddies,” in which their characters disguised themselves as women to live in an affordable, females-only apartment building. The two actors became pals and went on to work together in Hanks’ film directorial debut, “That Thing You Do!" and in the Broadway play “Lucky Guy." Scolari's survivors include his wife and four children. He was 66. More >>

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An attorney for members of the San Carlos Apache tribe has asked the the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to back a nonprofit group’s efforts to keep a copper mining company from gaining federal Arizona land the Apaches consider sacred. The attorney for Apache Stronghold said Friday the transfer would affect the survival of the Apache people. An attorney for the U.S. government responded that the transfer must proceed because it was part of legislation approved by Congress. The three-court panel did not immediately issue a ruling and will release a decision later. More >>

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A New York jury has convicted a former associate of Rudy Giuliani of charges that he made illegal campaign contributions to influence U.S. politicians and advance his business interests. The verdict convicting him on all six counts was returned Friday in Manhattan federal court. Lev Parnas was on trial for more than two weeks as prosecutors accused him of using other people’s money to pose as a powerful political broker and cozy up to some of the nation’s star Republican political figures. The case had drawn interest because Parnas had been involved in Giuliani’s efforts to get Ukrainian officials to investigate Joe Biden’s son. Giuliani wasn’t charged in the case. More >>

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A woman who was the victim of a serial killer and for the last 37 years was only known as Horseshoe Harriet has been identified through a DNA match. The Alaska Bureau of Investigations' cold case unit on Friday said 19-year-old Robin Pelkey was one of at least 12 victims of notorious Alaska serial killer Robert Hansen. She had been living on the streets of Anchorage when she disappeared in the early 1980s. Hansen told investigators he abducted her from downtown Anchorage, flew her to Horseshoe Lake immediately north of town and murdered her. He didn't know her name and left her there. The body was found in 1984, and identified last month through genetic genealogy. More >>

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A federal magistrate determined Friday that Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s former chief of staff can remain free before his trial on charges that he defrauded a state agency he led by inducing it to pay him nearly $280,000 in mostly severance pay before moving to the governor’s office. The Baltimore Sun reports that Magistrate Judge Thomas DiGirolamo ordered that Roy McGrath of Naples, Florida, won't be required to report to jail while awaiting trial at the initial appearance held virtually. McGrath has maintained in Facebook posts and emails to The Sun that he’s a victim of “politically motivated bullies” and his actions weren’t improper. More >>

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Conflicts over water are as old as history itself, but the massive Google data centers on the edge of a small Oregon town represent an emerging 21st century concern. Now a critical part of modern computing, data centers help people stream movies on Netflix, conduct transactions on PayPal, post updates on Facebook, store trillions of photos and more. But a single facility can also churn through millions of gallons of water each day to keep hot-running equipment cool. Now, Google wants to build at least two more data centers in The Dalles. But some residents are uneasy, worried there won’t be enough water for everyone.  More >>

Authorities say an employee who shot and killed a gunman at a Nebraska grain elevator likely prevented further loss of life. Nebraska State Patrol Sgt. Jeff Roby said Friday that the victims killed in Thursday's shooting at Agrex Elevator in Superior were 60-year-old Sandra Nelson, of Formoso, Kansas, and 53-year-old Darin Koepke, of Hadar, Nebraska. Roby said 61-year-old Max Hoskinson, of Superior, returned to the elevator after being fired on Thursday and shot the two victims and a third person who survived. Another employee retrieved a weapon and fatally shot Hoskinson. Roby said he could not comment on whether Hoskinson targeted the victims, who were all Agrex employees.  More >>

Ride-hailing company Lyft says more than 1,800 sexual assaults were reported by riders in 2019, and the number of incidents has been rising sharply in recent years. Lyft posted the numbers in a new safety report. The San Francisco-based company says more than 99% of rides occur without any safety issues being reported. The report lists 10 fatal assaults from 2017 through 2019. Sexual assaults ranging from touching to penetration rose each year covered by the report. In 2019, more than half involved non-consensual touching of a sexual body part. More >>

A woman is charged with killing her father, sister and two handymen in mid-Michigan. The Clare County prosecutor says 54-year-old Judy Boyer had a journal with names of other people whom she wanted to kill. Bond was set at $1 million Friday, and a not-guilty plea was entered on Boyer’s behalf. Authorities haven't disclosed a motive for the killings. The victims were Henry Boyer, his daughter Patricia Boyer, Zachary Salminen and Wade Bacon. Salminen and Bacon were at Henry Boyer's home to fix the roof and handle other jobs before cold weather arrived. Judy Boyer lived across the street.  More >>

Authorities have released 911 calls made by prominent South Carolina attorney Alex Murdaugh and two motorists after a Sept. 4 roadside shooting in which a bullet grazed Murdaugh's head. A woman passerby says on one call she saw a man bloodied and waving his hands on the roadside but she didn’t stop because it looked — in her words — “like a setup.” Police have since charged Murdaugh with insurance fraud, saying he tried to have himself killed so his surviving son could collect $10 million in life insurance payouts. The recordings were released Friday and in one Murdaugh says someone shot him when he stopped for a flat tire.  More >>

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A bust of Black Panther Party co-founder Huey Percy Newton is scheduled to be unveiled in Oakland, California, on Sunday, the first permanent public art piece honoring the party in the city of its founding. Newton remains a divisive figure. Many people still dismiss him as the leader of a band of beret-wearing, gun-toting hustlers -- and no doubt would deplore the prospect of an American city memorializing him with a statue.  Still, many love him to this day, venerating him as a man who sought to unite all Black, impoverished and oppressed people against racism. His influence on the Black Lives Matter movement is undeniable. More >>

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The company planning to bring President Donald Trump’s new media venture to the stock market soared again on Friday amid another frenzy of trading. Digital World Acquisition Corp. nearly tripled in the first minute of trading before trading in it was temporarily halted. It then gave up a chunk of those gains, but it still ended the day with a 107% gain to $94.20. In the morning, it climbed as high as $175. A day before, the stock more than quadrupled after it said it would merge with Trump Media & Technology Group. Experts are mixed on the company’s prospects.  More >>

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Stocks ended up with a mixed finish on Wall Street Friday after another choppy day of trading, but major indexes still marked their third weekly gains in a row. The S&P 500 slipped 0.1% as sizable drops in several big tech companies outweighed gains in other sectors. The benchmark index had set its latest record high a day earlier. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 0.2% and the Nasdaq retreated 0.8%. Intel sank after the giant chipmaker's revenue fell short of forecasts, and Snapchat's parent company plunged after saying its ad sales are being hurt by a privacy crackdown on iPhones.   More >>

Three sisters in a suburb of Orlando, Florida, share the same birthday, but they’re not twins or triplets. Instead, Sophia, Giuliana and Mia Lammert were each born Aug. 25, respectively, in 2015, 2018 and 2021. All were delivered naturally. Explaining the coincidence, their mother Kristin chalks the shared birthdays up to serendipity. When Kristin Lammert found out Mia’s due date was Sept. 8, 2021, she began wondering whether the baby might come a little early. Kristin Lammert and her husband Nick haven’t ruled out having more children. But whether they get another Aug. 25 birthday child is up to fate — and maybe a little nudge from mom. More >>

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Now that the decomposed remains of Brian Laundrie have been found, where does the investigation into the strangling of his girlfriend, Gabby Petito, go from here? Petito, 22, was discovered slain last month on the edge of Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, one place the couple had visited during a cross-country van trip that ended with Laundrie mysteriously returning home alone. Laundrie, named a “person of interest” in the case, was missing for a month before his skeletal remains were found Wednesday in a nature park. Experts say it's difficult but not impossible to prove whether Laundrie killed Petito. Another issue is whether his parents bear liability for possibly shielding him from investigators. More >>

The FBI says it has identified “quite a few” victims of a former girl’s basketball coach who helped run a Connecticut AAU program. Authorities on Friday said they are seeking the public's help in finding others. Danny Lawhorn of Hartford faces both state sexual assault and federal child enticement charges related to the alleged sexual abuse of three girls who played for the Bria Holmes Elite program between 2017 and this year. The FBI has set up a special website for victims to contact them. Lawhorn's attorney says his client was not coaching the 17-year-old at the center of the case at the time of the alleged abuse.  More >>

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A former Wisconsin high school teacher accused of secretly videotaping undressed students during field trips was sentenced Friday to 12 years in prison after reaching a plea deal with federal prosecutors. Thirty-nine-year-old David Kruchten earlier pleaded guilty to one count of attempting to produce child pornography. Prosecutors alleged Kruchten used his position as a business teacher at a Madison high school to secretly videotape students during field trips in Wisconsin and Minnesota in 2019. Students discovered hidden cameras planted in air fresheners in their hotel rooms during the Minneapolis trip. Kruchten was also sentenced to 20 years of supervised release. More >>

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A Minneapolis police officer has been charged with manslaughter and vehicular homicide for a crash in July that killed an innocent motorist while the officer was pursuing a stolen vehicle. Authorities say Officer Brian Cummings was driving nearly 80 mph in Minneapolis with his siren and lights activated when his squad car slammed into a different vehicle, killing 40-year-old Leneal Frazier. Frazier was the uncle of Darnella Frazier, whose cellphone video of Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd’s neck in 2020 was viewed worldwide and helped launch a global protest movement against racial injustice. The Frazier family and their attorneys welcomed the charges, saying no innocent civilian should ever die because of unwarranted high-speed chases. More >>

A Colorado day care owner convicted of keeping 26 children hidden in the basement of her business in 2019 has received a six-year prison sentence. A judge issued the sentence Thursday to Carla Faith after she was convicted by a jury in August. The case unfolded after police went to Faith's Colorado Springs day care because of reports it had more children than allowed. Officers found a false wall concealing the stairway to the basement. Many parents and relatives told a judge that the children kept in the basement have suffered trauma including sleeping problems and anxiety. Faith's lawyer says she made some “incredibly poor decisions.” More >>

North Dakota is working to extend its contract with Hollywood actor Josh Duhamel to promote tourism in his home state.  North Dakota’s top tourism official said the 48-year-old star of several “Transformers” movies has been effective in attracting visitors to the state better known for its brutal cold weather than as a vacation destination. The native of Minot and one of Hollywood’s leading men has been the face of North Dakota and its pitchman since 2013. He has been paid more than $1 million from the state since then. His current two-year tourism deal expires in December.  More >>

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Officials say two Florida police officers were wounded during a shootout before returning fire and killing the gunman. Doral police say both officers in the Friday morning shooting were expected to survive. Officials say officers were responding to some dispute between drivers, where one car was chasing the other. The man being chased was attempting to reach the nearby Miami-Dade Police Department headquarters. Police say the chaser lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a tree. He then exited his vehicle and immediately opened fire on the officers. Also wounded in the shooting was a man riding in panel truck that had no apparent connection to confrontation.  More >>

The University of Alabama has contracted with an online app in response to complaints over long concession lines at home football games during the coronavirus pandemic. The school is also making other changes in hopes of speeding up service when Tennessee visits for Saturday's homecoming. The capacity crowd of more than 101,000 will be able to use the Waitr app to place orders in the stadium. The company says the contract is its first for football, though it's had baseball game contracts in Louisiana and Mississippi. The school says more workers also are expected, and it's streamlining menus and adding technology to speed up sales. More >>

A U.S. Marine Corps veteran who disarmed a teenage robbery suspect in an Arizona gas station by grabbing the suspect's gun says he was just “doing what needed to be done.” James Kilcer was standing inside the gas station in Uman talking to the clerk on Wednesday when the gun-pointing suspect entered the store with two companions . Kilcer sprang at the suspect, grabbed his gun, wrestled him to the floor and held him at gunpoint until sheriff's deputies arrived. The 14-year-old suspect was booked into the county Juvenile Justice Center on charges of armed robbery and aggravated assault. The search is still on for the suspect's companions.  More >>

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A plea deal between Rod Stewart and Florida prosecutors to settle charges he and his adult son   battered a security guard at a New Year's Eve party two years ago has fallen through. Neither Rod Stewart nor his son, Sean, were present when Judge August Bonavita announced Friday that a hearing in which a deal was expected to be finalized had been canceled. The pair are now scheduled to stand trial on misdemeanor battery charges in January. The Stewarts are accused of pushing and punching a hotel security guard after they weren't allowed to take their group into a children's area of the hotel on Dec. 31, 2019, just before midnight.   More >>